Division of Cell and Developmental Biology
Division of Cell and Developmental Biology - Impaired trafficking of Notch in neoplastic ESCRT mutant Drosophila cells
Division of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology
Division of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology - Structure of the human Ndc80 kinetochore complex around microtubules
Division of Immunology and Pathogenesis
Division of Immunology and Pathogenesis - Salmonella typhimurium growing within a macrophage
Division of Neurobiology
Division of Neurobiology - Phosphorylation of mTOR in neurons in the striatum
Heterochromatin dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Division of Genetics, Genomics and Development - Heterochromatin dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Recent News

We had a fantastic weekend in Asilomar, CA, for our annual MCB Cell & Developmental Biology retreat. Thank you to David Drubin and Matt Welch for the photos, and to Diana Bautista and David Bilder for organizing such a successful event!

Congratulations to the 2018 class of HHMI Hanna Gray Fellows, including MCB PhD alums Carolyn Elya, Jeannette Tenthorey, and Arielle Woznica, as well as current MCB Postdoc Sara Campbell!

The Hanna Gray Fellowship is designed to support exceptional early career researchers from a diverse set of backgrounds. Fellows receive mentorship from the HHMI community and research funding for 8 years throughout their postdoctoral research and into a tenure-track faculty position.

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MCB & Chemistry Professor and HHMI Investigator Jennifer Doudna has been awarded the 2018 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize by The Rockefeller University. The prize honors women in biology who have made outstanding and revolutionary contributions to their field. Congratulations, Professor Doudna!

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A groundbreaking new study from the labs of MCB Professors Michael Rape and Richard Harland describes a quality control pathway, called DQC (dimerization quality control), for regulators of the BTB family. DQC removes BTB dimers of abberant composition from interrupting signal transduction in a cell.

A team of researchers led by MCB Professor Daniel Portnoy has discovered that many bacteria in the human gut microbiome, such as the species which cause listeriosis and gangrene, produce electricity as part of their metabolic processes.